abc
abc
Support for the WWII Online Exhibit is provided in part through a grant from the Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission and The Century Fund.

 

abc
WW II Home Front - Rationing  

The need to focus on wartime production of armaments and food for the troops led to civilian rationing to ensure fair distribution of goods. Each consumer received a ration book containing their allotment of ration points. Each rationed product cost a certain number of ration points as well as a certain amount of money

At the grocery store, blue points were for canned foods, while red points were for meat, fish, fats, and cheese. Sugar, rubber, shoes, gasoline, fuel oil, and many other products were also rationed. Americans found substitutes for products in short supply. The ban on silk and nylon (needed for parachutes) resulted in manufacturers offering products like “Stocking Stick” that women used to paint on simulated nylons.

 
     
 

Make it Do or Do Without!

Housewives helped the war effort by finding ways to stretch their limited supplies of rationed foods. The Department of Agriculture created an official program of “Victory Gardens.” By the summer of 1943, 20,000,000 Victory Gardens were planted throughout the country. They produced a stunning 40% of all the vegetables grown in America. Housewives also tried new wartime recipes that stretched rationed meat, fats, and sugar.